Beauty is skin deep

Little Felicity of Barrowfield is a short story from the book “Beautiful Inside and Out”. The name Felicity stands for ‘good luck’, and so there was no better way to name the protagonist of the first story other than this.

We live in an age where we get bullied and shamed for who we are and what we look like. Often people wish us to be just the way they like and condone those who do not adjust to their likeness. The main theme of the first story is about color discrimination. Discrimination based on skin color is also known as colorism or shadeism. The prejudice against darker-skinned people exists even today. It’s not a crime to be dark skinned. Just may be, children do not do it on purpose, maybe it’s out of childish ignorance. By being ignorant they do not realize they are hurting someone’s emotions and disrespecting them. But, it’s out of immaturity and can be controlled and corrected. It’s not the same with a teenager. Teenagers aren’t childish anymore, especially in an age of social media, with diverse exposure to varied forms of media. They know that their actions may harm someone, both mentally and physically.

 

It’s not a crime to be dark skinned. Just may be, children do not do it on purpose, maybe it’s out of childish ignorance. By being ignorant they do not realize they are hurting someone’s emotions and disrespecting them. But, it’s out of immaturity and can be controlled and corrected. It’s not the same with a teenager. Teenagers aren’t childish anymore, especially in an age of social media, with diverse exposure to varied forms of media. They know that their actions may harm someone, both mentally and physically.

The children who are discriminated and shamed are affected. We read and see so much about teens being bullied. They need to realize that there will be someone who will support them just as Felicity’s mother. They can share their worries with they parents, friends or anyone whom they are comfortable talking to. In the story when Mrs.Ann observes Felicity’s changed behavior, not being her happy self, she ensures that Felicity can come and have a conversation with her about anything.

The entire story is based in a fantasy land called Hamora. It’s just like any other English town with bakers and town girls. It has a town hall and gentle bourgeois houses. A gentle town, too good to be true. Everyone knows everyone, in the small town which characterizes slow-paced, friendly and gossipy place. The story is based in this town and it travels the reader slowly to the conclusion of why Felicity has been upset throughout only to reveal in the end.

            Felicity recited the entire story to Mrs.Ann. Her mother explained to her that the color of a person does not define their intelligence, character, and beauty. The beauty resides within a person and not outside. Judging someone on the basis of their color is not only wrong, but also mean and rude. It is ill-mannerly to mock someone whose complexion is different from yours. Beatrix, Clarissa, and Arlene learned that they shouldn’t be prejudiced. On the other hand, Felicity learned that she is beautiful inside and out.

By the end of the story, Felicity emerges as a person stronger than who she was, unfazed by the negative comments which people made about her.

Now, the Principal was very clever, she told the four girls that the secret answers to win the competition were hidden in a treasure box under the Big Banyan tree.
As soon as the girls heard the news they rushed to the Big Banyan tree, but little Felicity stayed back. The Principal asked her, “Don’t you want the answers to the quiz?”, Felicity replied, “I don’t want to cheat. I am not a cheater.” The Principal had found the real winner.

Get the book here

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